Book Review: Next Person You Meet in Heaven by Mitch Albom

38718233.jpgIn this enchanting sequel to the number one bestseller The Five People You Meet in Heaven, Mitch Albom tells the story of Eddie’s heavenly reunion with Annie—the little girl he saved on earth—in an unforgettable novel of how our lives and losses intersect.

Fifteen years ago, in Mitch Albom’s beloved novel, The Five People You Meet in Heaven, the world fell in love with Eddie, a grizzled war veteran- turned-amusement park mechanic who died saving the life of a young girl named Annie. Eddie’s journey to heaven taught him that every life matters. Now, in this magical sequel, Mitch Albom reveals Annie’s story.

The accident that killed Eddie left an indelible mark on Annie. It took her left hand, which needed to be surgically reattached. Injured, scarred, and unable to remember why, Annie’s life is forever changed by a guilt-ravaged mother who whisks her away from the world she knew. Bullied by her peers and haunted by something she cannot recall, Annie struggles to find acceptance as she grows. When, as a young woman, she reconnects with Paulo, her childhood love, she believes she has finally  found happiness.

As the novel opens, Annie is marrying Paulo. But when her wedding night day ends in an unimaginable accident, Annie finds herself on her own heavenly journey—and an inevitable reunion with Eddie, one of the five people who will show her how her life mattered in ways she could not have fathomed.

Poignant and beautiful, filled with unexpected twists, The Next Person You Meet in Heaven reminds us that not only does every life matter, but that every ending is also a beginning—we only need to open our eyes to see it.


Book Review:

“Because we embrace our scars more than our healing. […] We can recall the exact day we got hurt, but who remembers the day the wound was gone?”
― Mitch Albom, The Next Person You Meet in Heaven

Again, Mitch Albom was able to provide a compelling story about death, life, acceptance, grief, love, and wonders of how, us, a human could touch another person without knowing that we are helping them.

This book is a sequel from Five People You Meet in Heaven but with a different protagonist. May it have a different set of characters, here, Eddie, from the first book, shows up like what happened to him when he dies. He confronts his past, Annie accepts her failures. Eddie talks about his experiences. Annie forgives, not her mom, but herself.

Feelings, failures, deep emotions, tragic stories envelop the book. It teaches that no matter who you are, you are a person to be loved. This book enlightens me on some aspect of life. There are things in life that we don’t have control of. May it be our anxiety, self-pity, or it could be things that can get out of hand because life takes a toll on you and decided to fuck up your life. But Mitch Albom made me realized that there’s nothing good on looking on the negative perception of life and instead, to keep on looking forward and be positive for what happened and be grateful that you are still alive and finding the edge that you could provide not just for yourself but also to those people you will meet along the way.

Thus, you don’t need to set an expectation, may it be to your partner or to yourself, what important is you are able to figure out, to realize your purpose along the way. Annie in the book has a lot of worries, too much stress, and thinking but above all those things, I believe Annie is a wonderful human being — who is able to dedicate so much in her life that she could save a life without even knowing it.

What pierce me the most in this book is how nostalgic Mitch Albom’s writing style. Who would even know that I will be in pain for a character in just seven pages? The Next Person You Meet in Heaven by Mitch Albom is another book that will inspire people, the readers to be more empathetic with each other. I recently read in my planner a word. It says that their word for 2019 is, “Sonder” and the meaning of this word is the realization, may it be contemplation, of meeting someone or a stranger and you are able to demonstrate such understanding to this person — that as you have ambitions, goals, worries, struggles — they also have their own that constantly revolving, continuously moving life that you will meet with such complexity. And that word, my friend, is what I would like to use to describe this outstanding novel by Mitch Albom.

MY RATINGS: 5 STARS.

Amazon | Barnes & Noble | Kobo | Google Play

Get it on Google Play

[Also, check Bookie-Looker’s Book Review]

[It’s Book Talk: The Next Person You Meet In Heaven]

[Pre-publication Book Review of The Next Person You Meet in Heaven by Mitch Albom; Mani’s Book Corner]


Transfer15837 0060Mitchell David Albom is an author, journalist, screenwriter, playwright, radio and television broadcaster and musician. His books have collectively sold over 35 million copies worldwide; have been published in forty-one territories and in forty-two languages around the world; and have been made into Emmy Award-winning and critically-acclaimed television movies.

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5 thoughts on “Book Review: Next Person You Meet in Heaven by Mitch Albom

  1. I have read ‘Five persons..’ book a long time ago but had not thought about reading this other one. Great post.

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  2. Interesting review! I’ve been tempted to read Five People You Meet in Heaven, but after The First Phone Call from Heaven, I was left feeling somewhat enthusiastic to read more of Mitch Album. What I enjoy about his books though, are how there always seems to be a greater meaning behind the words. I might have to give the first book and this book a go!

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